Education, Health / Wellness, Kids, Mental health, Mindfulness

But… What is Mindfulness?

Welcome!

Miss T, here!

If you’ve been following my journey, you can probably already tell that I have a passion for promoting health & wellness through MINDFULNESS!

But… WHAT IS MINDFULNESS?

Chances are, if you stumbled on this blog, you have some sort of idea what mindfulness entails. But I’m going to simplify it for you! Because there are many interpretations of what mindfulness is and isn’t.

If we look up the definition of Mindfulness it notes:

“Mindfulness is the state of being consciously aware of something”

And quite literally, anything! It is focusing on one particular thing, whether that’s our breath or a part of our surroundings. Focusing on that one thing brings us into the present moment.

Yes, we can schedule certain mindfulness practices into our day, but we can also live each moment with a mindfulness mind set. Completing our daily tasks and going through daily events, mindfully!

We can eat mindfully by eliminating distractions. That means no watching TV or scrolling through our phones while we are trying to eat. Focusing solely on our food and enjoying it with all 5 of our senses. 

We can go for a walk or a drive mindfully! By tuning out any conversations and focusing on the sights and sounds around you! Even the smells, if you are outside in nature.

We can even have mindful conversations. Putting our phones away, turning off music, and focusing solely on our heartfelt conversation. Active listening is a wonderful way to have a mindful conversation.

We can even do our work with mindfulness in mind. By breaking down our day and focusing on one aspect of the day at a time. Being fully present in whatever your task is. 

Are you a Multi-Tasker? 

Multitasking is not a mindful activity. Our minds are constantly flipping between tasks and we are most definitely unable to focus our attention on one item! Not to mention, multi-tasking is not productive (unless you are of course the 1% exception to this rule or a computer), often taking a lot longer to complete all of your to-do’s and getting them done without paying attention to the details.

Multi-tasking tends to lead us to our MONKEY MIND.

“Monkey mind” is a buddhist term that refers to being unsettled, distracted, restless, even confused. It is the OPPOSITE of true mindfulness.

Our goal is to calm and settle our monkey mind in order to live truly mindful lives. 

So yes, mindfulness can be practiced at any time throughout your day. You can practice it anywhere, and with just about any activity (unless you’re combining activities, of course)! 

The key is AWARENESS! Being aware of your thoughts and your monkey mind. Being able to pause and say:

“Okay, I’m thinking about the past or future right now, when I should really be focused on the present.”

Awareness can be challenging, but it can also be TRAINED. You can get better at becoming more self-aware. All it takes is a little bit of practice and some deliberate scheduling of mindfulness into your day.

I highly recommend training your awareness by purposefully adding mindful moments into your day, whether that is with mindful breathing, mindful eating, practicing gratitude, yoga, etc. The important thing is to find what works best for you.

By intently adding it into your day, you are settling your monkey mind, and training your brain to think in the present moment, all the time!

Read my follow up post for more ideas on HOW to schedule mindfulness into your day!

One of my FAVOURITE ways of being mindful is by going on hikes in the mountains! Living in Alberta, Canada, I am grateful to have access to the Rocky Mountains, where I regularity “escape” to.

With love & gratitude,
Miss T.


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